With John still on the injured list, The Beatles continued as a trio today, working on a new number that George had come up with. This song, according to George’s autobiography,

was written at the time when Apple was getting like school, where we had to go and be businessmen: “Sign this” and “sign that.” Anyway, it seems as if winter in England goes on forever, by the time spring comes you really deserve it. So one day I decided I was going to sag off Apple and I went over to Eric Clapton’s house. The relief of not having to go see all those dopey accountants was wonderful, and I walked around the garden with one of Eric’s acoustic guitars and wrote “Here Comes the Sun.”

And how much can one really say about “Here Comes the Sun”? It’s simple, it’s direct, it’s beautiful. It’s genius.

One note though: The research I did today initially seemed to indicate that Carl Sagan wanted to include “HCTS” on the “Golden Record” carried by the 1977 Voyager space probe, but that this idea was scotched because of copyright concerns. Further digging found that this story is apocryphal. Too bad; it would have made sense to include The Beatles along with Chuck Berry, Blind Willie Johnson, Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart. (Though “Because” might have made a better choice.)(And “Space Oddity” should have been on there too.)

The Golden Record also includes other music from around the world, along with recorded sounds and greetings from the people of Earth. A perusal of the contents is an amusing way to spend a few minutes, say 3:06 or so.

And finally, Wikipedia says that since NASA had previously gotten flak for including line drawings of a naked man and woman on the Pioneer probe, “the agency chose not to allow Sagan and his colleagues to include a photograph of a nude man and woman on the record.” One wonders if they might not secretly have slipped in a copy of Two Virgins, which could even now be winging its way through interstellar space on its way to an encounter with some very confused aliens.