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The Beatles had first attempted “And Your Bird Can Sing,” on 4/20, and while it is pure speculation on my part to say that they had been too high to accomplish anything useful on that day, the record bears me out. Today they got down to brass tacks, working until after two in the morning to record 11 takes of John’s new song.

“And Your Bird Can Sing” has a typically ambivalent Lennon lyric, a statement of contempt leavened with a promise of loyalty:

When your prized possessions start to weigh you down
Look in my direction, I’ll be ’round, I’ll be ’round

I was wondering if it was addressed to anyone in particular, and The Wikipedia speculates thusly:

Some have interpreted the lyrics as a message from John to Paul, who was the last unmarried Beatle at the time and the only one living in London. It is theorized that John felt neglected as an artistic partner as Paul feverishly explored the many artistic sights and sounds of London at the time.

Which led me to wonder, has anyone written a book specifically about just the relationship between Lennon and McCartney? And of course someone has. In 2014 one Adam Thomas published Lennon vs. McCartney: The Beatles, Inter-band Relationships and the Hidden Messages to Each Other in Their Song Lyrics,

A stunning new book showing how the Beatles’ song lyrics contain secret conversations between John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Varying between strong affection and outright hostility, these hidden messages clearly mirror the fluctuations the two Beatles were experiencing in their personal relationship at the time. The Beatles themselves have made only fleeting references to this troubled phase. Paul McCartney acknowledges what he calls the “song wars” period, confirming that, at the time, “I was really writing a lot of songs to John.” John Lennon meanwhile played down the negative tone of his messages saying “I’m entitled to call Paul what I want and vice versa. It’s in our family.

And, Jesus, do I have to read that one now too? A Beatlemaniac’s work is never done.